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Welcome to my blog. I document my adventures in life, travel and food. Hope you have a nice stay!

An Afternoon in Wells

An Afternoon in Wells

Wells! The smallest city in England. It's a cute little town with a great market in the main square on Saturdays and is home to a beautiful medieval cathedral. 


We started our day by walking past the market and down to a little old church, St. Cuthbert's. I got a Cornish Pasty to eat on the way. 

St. Cuthbert's

St. Cuthbert's

Inside St. Cuthbert's

Inside St. Cuthbert's

Inside St. Cuthbert's

Inside St. Cuthbert's


We headed back toward the market square and stumbled across this adorable little sweet shop! If you're ever in England make sure to try some of the old fashioned British sweets! My favourite are the cherry ropes with cream filling. 

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Bishop's Palace and Gardens

After getting thoroughly buzzed on sugar, we made our way toward the famous Wells Cathedral. On our way we found the beautiful old Bishop's Palace and Garden's, where the Bishops of the Wells Cathedral lived back in the day. It's very picturesque and even has a moat! 

Bishop's Palace Entrance

Bishop's Palace Entrance

The moat around Bishop's Palace, plus some swans!

The moat around Bishop's Palace, plus some swans!

Luc walking across the drawbridge 

Luc walking across the drawbridge 


Wells Cathedral

Next we went to Wells Cathedral, perhaps the most beautiful in England! It's definitely our favourite so far. It's also home to a famous medieval clock, dating from around 1390. It is the second oldest original working clock in the world and the oldest with its original dials. Above the clock sit miniature figures of knights on horseback, and every quarter-hour the jousting knights gallop round the turret above the clock face. The same one has been knocked down every time for over six hundred years! We got to watch this ancient ritual happen.

Wells Cathedral

Wells Cathedral

Wells Cathedral

Wells Cathedral

Wells Cathedral

Wells Cathedral

Wells Cathedral. The Intricate architecture looks very modern, but it's actually original and is part of the reason that the cathedral still stands today as it was 700 years ago. The curved structure provides equal support to all sides of the structure. 

Wells Cathedral. The Intricate architecture looks very modern, but it's actually original and is part of the reason that the cathedral still stands today as it was 700 years ago. The curved structure provides equal support to all sides of the structure. 

The medieval clock

The medieval clock

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Vicars' Close

We continued walking past the cathedral to another major attraction in Wells, Vicars' Close, the oldest preserved medieval street in England. 

Vicars' Close

Vicars' Close

Vicars' Close

Vicars' Close

Vicars' Close

Vicars' Close

Vicars' Close

Vicars' Close

The next part of our trip was a bit random...


Wookey Hole

WOOKEY HOLE! To give you an idea of what it is, here's an excerpt from the website:

Somerset, in the South of England, is a land of mysteries. Here at Wookey Hole, where a river flows out of the underworld, pagan and Christian legends intermingle.

Here, too are mysteries of man himself. How did the early cavemen, who inhabited these caves, really live from day to day? And what makes a modern diver explore the caverns beyond the sunlight?

Even the earliest men who lived in the valley of Wookey Hole 50,000 years ago, hunting bear and rhinoceros with stone weapons, must have been in awe of the great caves for they had already existed for millions of years.

When, much later, the Celtic peoples of the Iron Age were moving into Britain, they found the caves a safe and even comfortable place to live – inside, the temperature is a constant 11° Celsius. Yet by the 15th century only bones, broken pottery and legends remained.

Then, in 1914 the archaeologist Herbert Balch, having completed a two year excavation of the caves, published his findings, and the age of real exploration had begun…

Visitors came to wonder at the secret river and its encrusted caverns. Perhaps Coleridge was inspired to write the lines: “Where Alph, the sacred river, ran, Through caverns measureless to man”

So that's Wookey Hole. It was fun and a little silly. The attraction of the caves has expanded to also include a small amusement park with a mini golf course, antique arcade, mirror maze, and many other random things. And it's in the middle of nowhere. 

Wookey Hole

Wookey Hole

Laughing sailor at Wookey Hole arcade

Laughing sailor at Wookey Hole arcade

Fortune teller at Wookey Hole arcade

Fortune teller at Wookey Hole arcade


DONE! Now to write about Poland! Then we're traveling to Amsterdam in a couple of weeks, so more blogging to come!

Kraków

Kraków

Ireland

Ireland